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From Bonnie and Clyde to Natural Born Killers, film history have been peppered by the most smitten of criminals.The appeal to audiences? The star-crossed fate is one that always provides for a thrilling ride. Not to mention if the film is backed by an innovative director, such as David Lowery. He was dubbed one of the 25 new faces of independent film in 2011, and has a beautiful, fluid style of direction (likened to the gorgeous work of Terrance Malick). This film solidifies his title as a prominent new director. The cast, too, serves up a treat, with the Rooney Mara and Casey Afleck.

The film debuted at the 2013 Sundance Film Festival, where it claimed the award for best Cinematography from the States and was also nominated for the Grand Jury Prize. It has been selected to compete in the International Critics’ Week section at the 2013 Cannes Film Festival.

Watch: the trailer on YouTube here.

Read: Dazed & Confused’s ‘Top Ten Badass Outlaw Couples’ here. 

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The advantages of having friends in publishing is that they often here about literary events well before you do. Last week, news quickly spread in the office at Penguin of the Melbourne Writers Festival ticket sales. My friend managed to nab two tickets to see Jacqueline Rose speak with Justin Clemins and she kindly invited me to come with her. I said yes, unaware of who Rose was, but having full faith in my friends judgment of what I would enjoy.

Rose is a world-renowned literary critic and scholar. She has written on a broad range of topics within the literary and the political, most notably psychoanalysis, Zionism and feminism. She fluidly combines these two fields that are so rigidly divided in most educational institutions. Her most amazing feat is her application of a psychoanalytic framework on the state of Israel.

I spent much of the one-hour event completely astounded as she so articulately discussed this analysis. She stressed the importance of what lies beneath, of the details, of what gets pushed back and censored out of everyday life. With Israel, it seemed that her shock lay mostly with the wide acceptance of it as a home for ALL Jews, not just Israelis. Much political rhetoric that is unquestionably accepted needs to be examined in most cases. The problem is that we don’t question. We are told what to do and we shut-up and do it.

What is so supremely cool about her work is the way she breathes life and relevance into longstanding theories, such as Freudian psychoanalysis. She has, of course, received a world of criticism for it. In an article for The Guardian, she provided a defence:

I think it’s Nietzsche who says somewhere that it’s the people who are walking around happy, as if everything’s perfect, who have something to be ashamed of. For psychoanalysis, psychic difficulty is your birthright and it’s our attempt to repudiate it that makes it worse. So the point for me in using psychoanalysis to understand why a traumatised people might find locking themselves into a traumatised identity is to treat them with the greatest respect.”

Meeting her after the event made me bashful and weak at the knees. Not often do you find a women at the forefront of her field so genuine and engaging. I want to end up working in a job somehow related to books and international affairs, and Jacqueline Rose was another affirmation of that goal.